Spanish ruby pistol serial numbers

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This Spanish-made. Like so many wars of times past, belligerents felt that it would be over in a few weeks or months and resources at hand would be sixe karnr walo k mobila num than adequate to deal with the situation.

Subsequent events proved them woefully wrong, as year after year of grueling combat on several continents ground down men and materiel at an unprecedented rate. At the beginning of World War I, France had one of the largest standing armies in the world, with a total ofregulars and 46, colonial troops.

Upon mobilization, by the summer of another 2. Even the high attrition rate eventually 4. This well-made, well-designed double-action six-shot chambered an 8mm cartridge that fired a Not exactly hard-hitting, but not unusual ballistics when compared with some of the other European revolvers of the period.

Though the revolver had been in production sinceauthorities soon realized that there were not enough on hand, nor would production be adequate to keep up with demand.

Ruby pistol

Also, the maker, Manufacture de Armes de St. Etienne, was ordered to sideline handgun production in favor of rifles and machine guns—a not unreasonable switchover. As a stopgap, many of the older 11mm Model revolvers were brought out of retirement. Though basically possessed of midth century technology, they were rugged and robust, and their cartridge was actually slightly more potent than that of the Ordnance revolver.

Still it was not enough. Spain was neutral during World War I and also was one of the largest suppliers of inexpensive civilian firearms in Europe. Another gun that did not go unnoticed by Iberian makers was the excellent Model Browning Hammerless pocket pistol, manufactured both by Colt in the U.

Azuma dawa ya nini top-notch little blowback was a popular civilian arm—reliable and relatively unobtrusive.

spanish ruby pistol serial numbers

In riding mower wire diagram diagram base website wire diagram time at all, Spanish variants of the pistol appeared, turned out by a number of manufacturers, and Gabilondo y Urresti of Guernica made one of the best.

Brand named Ruby, this little 7. Though its silhouette was somewhat different from the Colt, the basic mechanism was much the same.Back at the beginning of the 20th century, Spain had a significant number of relatively small gunmaking shops throughout its northern Basque area. The area has been known for its metalworking resources and prowess for literally two thousand years, and it is little surprise that firearms manufacture would thrive there.

In addition, a loophole in Spanish patent law gave these small shops an international advantage: a Spanish patent was only valid if the device in question was actually manufactured in Spain within three years of patent being granted.

The major arms designers of the time had their factories in France, Germany, Great Britain, and elsewhere, but not in Spain. So new firearms developments were, practically speaking, not patented in Spain and could be copied there without legal penalty.

Star Firearms

Spanish shops quickly began making their own copies of this very popular pistol, and one of them hit the proverbial jackpot. Inthe company of Gabilondo y Urresti later to become known as Llama built a better-than-average copy called the Ruby, chambered for.

Gabilondo sent a sample to France, whose government was in need of a huge number of pistols for the recently-begun First World War. The French found the pistol to be well-suited to their needs cheap and effectiveand proceeded to place a standing order in May for 10, of them per month.

One can only imagine the Gabilondo shop receiving news of this staggering order — because at that time they had less than 10 employees between 5 and 8, depending on which source you read. There is no conceivable way they could have produced anywhere near this quantity of firearms, but now they had a contract for them. Talk about the right kind of problem to have! Each of these subcontractors was to produce pistols per month for Gabilondo, who would control overall QC and deliver the guns to France.

By this time August the French contract had increased to 30, pistols per months, and would later jump again to 50, per month. The contract terms specified that the subcontractors would be fined for any failure to meet the monthly quota, and any pistols over the required would be purchased by Gabilondo at the standard rate. The early shipments of guns from Gabilondo were satisfactory to the French Army, but not surprisingly the contract terms led to a degradation of quality as shops pushed quantity over quality to maximize their profit.

Shops around Eibar in need of work saw the French as a golden opportunity, and jumped into the fray. Some worked with Gabilondo, while many others negotiated their own deals directly with French purchasing agents. The resulting pistols had the same general configuration —. None of them shared interchangeable parts or magazinesthough, and each manufacturer used its own trademark name.

For the obsessive dedicated collector, these trade names make Eibar-type pistols a virtually bottomless well. In addition to French sales, many were also sold to the Italian Army, as that country struggled to keep up with domestic production of military pistols.

Some companies manufactured the guns from scratch, while others subcontractor some or even all of the component parts to other suppliers. There are a few ways to determine if a particular one was made for French WWI contract and thus likely saw military use. Pistols made for the French Army typically had a one- or two-letter mark in an oval on the rear left of the frame. These letters identified the manufacturer, irrespective of trademark name see below for a list of these markings.

In addition, pistols were supposed to be marked with a star or pair of stars on the bottom of the frame alongside the magazine well when they were formally accepted for French service. Not all of them received this depending on how urgent the need for guns was when a shipment arrived, but it is a useful marking to look for.Back at the beginning of the 20th century, Spain had a significant number of relatively small gunmaking shops throughout its northern Basque area.

The area has been known for its metalworking resources and prowess for literally two thousand years, and it is little surprise that firearms manufacture would thrive there. In addition, a loophole in Spanish patent law gave these small shops an international advantage: a Spanish patent was only valid if the device in question was actually manufactured in Spain within three years of patent being granted.

The major arms designers of the time had their factories in France, Germany, Great Britain, and elsewhere, but not in Spain. So new firearms developments were, practically speaking, not patented in Spain and could be copied there without legal penalty. Spanish shops quickly began making their own copies of this very popular pistol, and one of them hit the proverbial jackpot.

Inthe company of Gabilondo y Urresti later to become known as Llama built a better-than-average copy called the Ruby, chambered for. Gabilondo sent a sample to France, whose government was in need of a huge number of pistols for the recently-begun First World War.

The French found the pistol to be well-suited to their needs cheap and effectiveand proceeded to place a standing order in May for 10, of them per month. One can only imagine the Gabilondo shop receiving news of this staggering order — because at that time they had less than 10 employees between 5 and 8, depending on which source you read.

There is no conceivable way they could have produced anywhere near this quantity of firearms, but now they had a contract for them. Talk about the right kind of problem to have! Each of these subcontractors was to produce pistols per month for Gabilondo, who would control overall QC and deliver the guns to France. By this time August the French contract had increased to 30, pistols per months, and would later jump again to 50, per month. The contract terms specified that the subcontractors would be fined for any failure to meet the monthly quota, and any pistols over the required would be purchased by Gabilondo at the standard rate.

The early shipments of guns from Gabilondo were satisfactory to the French Army, but not surprisingly the contract terms led to a degradation of quality as shops pushed quantity over quality to maximize their profit. Shops around Eibar in need of work saw the French as a golden opportunity, and jumped into the fray. Some worked with Gabilondo, while many others negotiated their own deals directly with French purchasing agents.

The resulting pistols had the same general configuration —. None of them shared interchangeable parts or magazinesthough, and each manufacturer used its own trademark name. For the obsessive dedicated collector, these trade names make Eibar-type pistols a virtually bottomless well.

In addition to French sales, many were also sold to the Italian Army, as that country struggled to keep up with domestic production of military pistols. Some companies manufactured the guns from scratch, while others subcontractor some or even all of the component parts to other suppliers. There are a few ways to determine if a particular one was made for French WWI contract and thus likely saw military use.Remember Me?

What's New? Forum Gunboards. Results 1 to 6 of 6. Thread: WWI "Ruby" pistol - what year? Join Date Jan Posts WWI "Ruby" pistol - what year?

So there I was, in a little gunshop, when suddenly something caught my eye - I knew what it was right away, and after getting the price down to bucks I snatched it. What I purchased was a WWI semi-automatic pistol chambered in 7. Each small internal part is marked with "" and they all match. Each wooden grip is also marked on the inside and the frame has same matching marks - so even the grips appear original.

Magazine that came with it is not marked in anyway, but it is deffinitely from the same era as the pistol. Here is what I know about these pistols: they were manufactured during WWI for the French military and are known as "Ruby" pistols.

They are based on the Colt model. The French had issues with production so they contracted their Spanish neighbours to manufacture large quantities. Since so many people made them, quality control was poor - the ones that were accepted into military service by the French were stamped with 2 five point stars on the bottom of the frame, one on each side of the mag well my pistol is not stamped with these Here is what I really would like to find out - when exactly was my pistol made?

Any help is greatly appreciated. Attachment Attachment Attachment Join Date Dec Posts I'd suggest reposting this on the Spanish pistol forum for a more detailed reply. I believe the moderator there is well versed in these weapons. Bob In St. Considering the stages of gearing up that occurred with the Spanish Eibar pistol smiths, your Martian was likely made in the late to era. There is no definitive database of serial numbers. Italian inventoried pieces will have a small "RP" or "TM" stamped in the trigger web area.

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements. That's what I was leaning towards -and mine does not appear to be of Italian inventory.

spanish ruby pistol serial numbers

One final question - is there production estimates for these pistols? I didn't know we had a Spanish handgun forum - and that's an excellent post and all I need to know about my new pistol. All times are GMT The time now is AM.

Ruby Pistol in .32 ACP (Spanish Production for French in WWI)

All rights reserved. Privacy Policy.Back at the beginning of the 20th century, Spain had a significant number of relatively small gunmaking shops throughout its northern Basque area.

The area has been known for its metalworking resources and prowess for literally two thousand years, and it is little surprise that firearms manufacture would thrive there. In addition, a loophole in Spanish patent law gave these small shops an international advantage: a Spanish patent was only valid if the device in question was actually manufactured in Spain within three years of patent being granted.

The major arms designers of the time had their factories in France, Germany, Great Britain, and elsewhere, but not in Spain. So new firearms developments were, practically speaking, not patented in Spain and could be copied there without legal penalty.

Spanish shops quickly began making their own copies of this very popular pistol, and one of them hit the proverbial jackpot. Inthe company of Gabilondo y Urresti later to become known as Llama built a better-than-average copy called the Ruby, chambered for. Gabilondo sent a sample to France, whose government was in need of a huge number of pistols for the recently-begun First World War. The French found the pistol to be well-suited to their needs cheap and effectiveand proceeded to place a standing order in May for 10, of them per month.

spanish ruby pistol serial numbers

One can only imagine the Gabilondo shop receiving news of this staggering order — because at that time they had less than 10 employees between 5 and 8, depending on which source you read. There is no conceivable way they could have produced anywhere near this quantity of firearms, but now they had a contract for them.

Talk about the right kind of problem to have! Each of these subcontractors was to produce pistols per month for Gabilondo, who would control overall QC and deliver the guns to France. By this time August the French contract had increased to 30, pistols per months, and would later jump again to 50, per month.

The contract terms specified that the subcontractors would be fined for any failure to meet the monthly quota, and any pistols over the required would be purchased by Gabilondo at the standard rate. The early shipments of guns from Gabilondo were satisfactory to the French Army, but not surprisingly the contract terms led to a degradation of quality as shops pushed quantity over quality to maximize their profit. Shops around Eibar in need of work saw the French as a golden opportunity, and jumped into the fray.

Some worked with Gabilondo, while many others negotiated their own deals directly with French purchasing agents. The resulting pistols had the same general configuration —. None of them shared interchangeable parts or magazinesthough, and each manufacturer used its own trademark name.

For the obsessive dedicated collector, these trade names make Eibar-type pistols a virtually bottomless well. In addition to French sales, many were also sold to the Italian Army, as that country struggled to keep up with domestic production of military pistols. Some companies manufactured the guns from scratch, while others subcontractor some or even all of the component parts to other suppliers.

There are a few ways to determine if a particular one was made for French WWI contract and thus likely saw military use. Pistols made for the French Army typically had a one- or two-letter mark in an oval on the rear left of the frame. These letters identified the manufacturer, irrespective of trademark name see below for a list of these markings. In addition, pistols were supposed to be marked with a star or pair of stars on the bottom of the frame alongside the magazine well when they were formally accepted for French service.

Not all of them received this depending on how urgent the need for guns was when a shipment arrived, but it is a useful marking to look for. Mechanically, they are all straight blowback and lack a last-round holdopen feature or grip safety. One feature that can be tied to wartime service is the addition of a large rivet-looking knob on the left side of the slide.

This was added to address the reported problem of tight French military holsters catching and disengaging the safety lever when the guns were drawn, and this was blamed for a number of accidental discharges. The added knob held the holster material up away from the side of the gun, and prevented it from catching on the safety. The knob was clearly added after manufacture, as it will typically cover part of the serial number or other markings on the slide.

Please note: We are unable to verify much of this list, as we found it copied from a since-deleted web page and we have no source for the information.A very international piece of weaponry, it was closely modeled after John Browning 's Pocket Hammerless design produced by Coltand was produced by over 50 Spanish companies, but primarily by the Spanish Gabilondo y Urresti firm the official "Gabilondo Ruby".

It was decommissioned inmore than a decade after World War II was brought to an end, and was subsequently replaced.

Injust before the start of the First World War, Gabilondo started manufacture of a sturdy self-loading pistol based on the Browning Model and chambered for the 7.

spanish ruby pistol serial numbers

Unusual for the time, the magazine capacity was nine shots instead of the usual six or seven. The pistol was intended for export to the Americas, and despite the small calibre it was designed with military and police sales in mind. Other Spanish manufacturers had copied the Browning since around The Ruby, apart from the extended magazine appears to be a direct copy of a pistol called the "Victoria" made by Esperanza and Unceta.

This pistol used features patented by Pedro Careaga inand by the Esperanza and Unceta company in These patents may have covered the frame-mounted safety instead of a grip safetyand an internal striker instead of a hammer. In Gabilondo sent examples of the pistols to the French government, who were hard-pressed for all sorts of small-arms, even in this early stage of the war. By August the target had been raised to 30, and later still an incredible 50, a month.

Despite its size, the company could barely cope with the initial contract and arranged for four partners to manufacture the Ruby for them:. The contract stipulated that each company would produce a minimum of 5, pistols per month. Gabilondo would produce 10, guns, carry out overall quality control and arrange delivery to the French authorities in Bayonne. As the number of pistols required increased the company agreed to purchase any pistols in excess of the agreed number at the same contracted price.

As demand increased Gabilondo recruited another three partners to help manufacture the Ruby. Estimates of Gabilondo Ruby production are betweenandpistols in total.

While most Gabilondo contract pistols were of good quality, others were less well made. As the French became more desperate, the procurement process spiralled out of control. Eventually Gabilondo contracted with another three companies and at least 45 other companies contracted with the French directly to produce Ruby-type pistols in a variety of calibres, barrel lengths and magazine capacities.

This was to prevent the possibly fatal consequence at the front line of either not being able to insert a new magazine, or having a loaded magazine detach from the gun in action. Many Ruby-type pistols were plagued by poor finish and incorrectly hardened steel parts which, after a short period of use, could become so badly worn that a very dangerous situation known as a "runaway gun" could result.

Another danger characteristic to poorly manufactured Ruby pistols were faulty safety mechanisms - due to improper fitting or the use of inappropriate materials for critical safety components. AboutRuby-types were accepted by the French from all sources and byaboutwere still serviceable and in French army stores.

Many other allied nations, and some of the new nations created after the War such as Finland and Yugoslavia also used Ruby-type pistols. Gabilondo ceased production in and switched to more advanced models, but other firms continued to produce the Ruby-type until the Great Depression wiped out many arms producers. The Ruby-type pistol is very intuitive to operate, even for novices. The slide stop doubles as a safety and field stripping is remarkably simple.Remember Me?

Results 1 to 11 of Thread: Who made it? Thread Tools Show Printable Version. Who made it? On the left side of the slide it says very faintly, looks like someone polished off too much material "Automatic Pistol Cal 6.

My phone won't take a proper picture of it, and it's faint at best to begin with. The only other identifying feature I can find is the cartouche on the stocks. Anyone here have any idea who made it? Also, I have brass, Dies, and primers, but no projectiles While we're at it, who's got a few to spare? Try Astra. They've had several models Cub, Could have been anyone in Spain with a file. Lots of small makers in the old days.

If it was easy, anybody could do it. Not a 'Baby Browning clone' This type of small handgun made by many companys in Spain. The Ruby pistols were 7. This is a Spanish copy of the Browning There is a sticky at the top of the page that may be of help.

But, There were literally scores of manufacturers of these guns. Those grips are distinctive, but at this late date, it may be difficult. Most of these manufacturers were put out of business after the Triumph of Franco during the decades of his dictatorship. Last edited by rintinglen; at PM. The Baby Browning is striker-fired I would bet money that gun has a internal hammer. Thanks to everyone who chimed in, unfortunately it's more difficult to appraise without a definite answer as to who made it.

I'll take any more information I can get. Look on the frame for reminants of a circle or oval with a couple letters in it Many Spanish makers used such a marking If it has something like this can maybe identify a manufacturer The name, "DUAN" should appear on the slide just after 6.


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